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Vocabulary Word

Word: deference

Definition: courteous regard for another's wish; courteous yielding to another's wish or opinion (showing respect); ADJ. deferential; OP. effrontery


Sentences Containing 'deference'

The dark deference of fear and slavery, my friend,''observed the Marquis,``will keep the dogs obedient to the whip, as long as this roof,''looking up to it,``shuts out the sky.''
I assure you, that if Darcy were not such a great tall fellow, in comparison with myself, I should not pay him half so much deference.
Elizabeth was chiefly struck by his extraordinary deference for Lady Catherine, and his kind intention of christening, marrying, and burying his parishioners whenever it were required.
She is the sort of woman whom one can not regard with too much deference.''
Elizabeth was at no loss to understand from whence this deference to her authority proceeded; but it was not in her power to give any information of so satisfactory a nature as the compliment deserved.
The fact is, that you were sick of civility, of deference, of officious attention.
He was treated with marked courtesy by the captain and with marked deference by all the officers and servants; and this deferential spirit was quickly communicated to the passengers, too.
Presently he ventured to remark, with deference`Pretty good stage of the river now, ain't it, sir?'
All would pay deference to an officer like you, with a fierce mustache and a long sabre, but they think they may crush a poor weeping girl with impunity.''
He made his way along the corridors through force of habit; he threw aside his magisterial robe, not out of deference to etiquette, but because it was an unbearable burden, a veritable garb of Nessus, insatiate in torture.
I am aware that two palaeontologists, whose opinions are worthy of much deference, namely Bronn and Woodward, have concluded that the average duration of each formation is twice or thrice as long as the average duration of specific forms.
In short, Sancho, I would have thee tell me all that has come to thine ears on this subject; and thou art to tell me, without adding anything to the good or taking away anything from the bad; for it is the duty of loyal vassals to tell the truth to their lords just as it is and in its proper shape, not allowing flattery to add to it or any idle deference to lessen it.
They were all taken aback, and not one of them dared to utter a word, such deference did they pay him.
But when philosophers, who pretend to neglect authority, and to cultivate reason, hold the same discourse, I pay them not, I own, the same obsequious submission and pious deference.
"Oh, if you say so, Mr. Jones, it is all right," said the stranger with deference.
In spite of the light brown dustcoat and leather-leggings which he wore in deference to his rustic surroundings, I had no difficulty in recognising Lestrade, of Scotland Yard.
Immense deference was shown to the Henry Spikers, male and female; which Agnes told me was on account of Mr. Henry Spiker being solicitor to something Or to Somebody, I forget what or which, remotely connected with the Treasury.
I replied, with all due deference to his experience (but with more deference, I am afraid, to his being Dora's father), that perhaps it was a little nonsensical that the Registry of that Court, containing the original wills of all persons leaving effects within the immense province of Canterbury, for three whole centuries, should be an accidental building, never designed for the purpose, leased by the registrars for their Own private emolument, unsafe, not even ascertained to be fire-proof, choked with the important documents it held, and positively, from the roof to the basement, a mercenary speculation of the registrars, who took great fees from the public, and crammed the public's wills away anyhow and anywhere, having no other object than to get rid of them cheaply.
The deference which both she and Traddles showed towards the Beauty, pleased me very much.
These creatures being puffed up with the fulsome flattery of a set of flesh-flies, which are continually buzzing about them, carry themselves with the utmost insolence imaginable; insomuch, that you must speak to them with a great deal of deference, or you are sure to be affronted.

More Vocab Words

::: wily - crafty; cunning; artful; N. wile: deceitful stratagem
::: manumit - emancipate; free from slavery or bondage
::: adjutant - staff officer assisting the commander; assistant
::: unrequited - not requited; not reciprocated; Ex. unrequited love
::: accessible - easy to approach; obtainable
::: chasten - discipline; punish in order to correct; CF. castigate
::: immaculate - spotless; flawless; absolutely clean
::: dilettante - aimless follower of an art or a field of knowledge (not taking it seriously); amateur; dabbler; CF. delight
::: unwarranted - unjustified; having no justification; groundless; baseless; undeserved
::: synchronous - similarly timed; simultaneous with; occurring at the same time; V. synchronize