Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: conception

Definition: beginning; forming of an idea; fertilization; V. conceive: form an idea in the mind; devise; become pregnant; CF. inception


Sentences Containing 'conception'

This was very amiable, but Charlotte's kindness extended farther than Elizabeth had any conception of; its object was nothing else than to secure her from any return of Mr. Collins's addresses, by engaging them towards herself.
Instead of an individual he gives us the expression of a glowing mental conception of man as a type of physical strength and power.
Unity is concerned with the relationship of all the parts to that oneness of conception that should control every detail of a work of art.
There is this deadness about any conception of perfection that will always make it an unattainable ideal in life.
The sculpture of ancient Egypt is an instance of great unity in conception, and the suppression of variety to a point at which life scarcely exists.
Not necessarily a flow of actual lines -LRB- although these often exist -RRB-; they may be only imaginary lines linking up or massing certain parts, and bringing them into conformity with the rhythmic conception of the whole.
The freedom with which new parts were built on to a Gothic building is another proof of the fact that it is not in the conception of the unity of the whole that their chief charm consists.
On the other hand, a fine classic building is the result of one large conception to which every part has rigorously to conform.
However imaginative your conception, and no matter how far you may carry your design, working from imagination, there will come a time when studies from nature will be necessary if your work is to have the variety that will give life and interest.
If this variety of form in your work is allowed to become excessive it will overpower the unity of your conception.
And nothing should be done that is out of harmony with this large conception.
If the unity of his conception is allowed to exclude variety entirely, it will result in a dead abstraction, and if the variety is to be allowed none of the restraining influences of unity, it will develop into a riotous extravagance.
Marquette had solemnly contracted, on the feast of the Immaculate Conception, that if the Virgin would permit him to discover the great river, he would name it Conception, in her honor.
In this work there are many details connected with the forms of these shelter dykes, their arrangements so as to present a series of settling basins, etc., a description of which would only complicate the conception.
It would be hard to conceive of anything more vapid than the style and conception of these letters; clearly the man was a pedant without imagination or taste.
Mr. Croll, in an interesting paper, remarks that we do not err "in forming too great a conception of the length of geological periods," but in estimating them by years.
If you tell me, that any person is in love, I easily understand your meaning, and form a just conception of his situation; but never can mistake that conception for the real disorders and agitations of the passion.
It is readily allowed, that other beings may possess many senses of which we can have no conception; because the ideas of them have never been introduced to us in the only manner by which an idea can have access to the mind, to wit, by the actual feeling and sensation.
It could not, therefore, be discovered in the cause, and the first invention or conception of it, _a priori_, must be entirely arbitrary.
Sight or feeling conveys an idea of the actual motion of bodies; but as to that wonderful force or power, which would carry on a moving body for ever in a continued change of place, and which bodies never lose but by communicating it to others; of this we cannot form the most distant conception.
It lies not merely in any peculiar idea, which is annexed to such a conception as commands our assent, and which is wanting to every known fiction.
We can, in our conception, join the head of a man to the body of a horse; but it is not in our power to believe that such an animal has ever really existed.
Whenever any object is presented to the memory or senses, it immediately, by the force of custom, carries the imagination to conceive that object, which is usually conjoined to it; and this conception is attended with a feeling or sentiment, different from the loose reveries of the fancy.
For as there is no matter of fact which we believe so firmly that we cannot conceive the contrary, there would be no difference between the conception assented to and that which is rejected, were it not for some sentiment which distinguishes the one from the other.
This conception implies no contradiction; but still it feels very differently from that conception by which I represent to myself the impulse and the communication of motion from one ball to another.
I say, then, that belief is nothing but a more vivid, lively, forcible, firm, steady conception of an object, than what the imagination alone is ever able to attain.
But as it is impossible that this faculty of imagination can ever, of itself, reach belief, it is evident that belief consists not in the peculiar nature or order of ideas, but in the _manner_ of their conception, and in their _feeling_ to the mind.
I confess, that it is impossible perfectly to explain this feeling or manner of conception.
Does it happen, in all these relations, that, when one of the objects is presented to the senses or memory, the mind is not only carried to the conception of the correlative, but reaches a steadier and stronger conception of it than what otherwise it would have been able to attain?
Superstitious people are fond of the reliques of saints and holy men, for the same reason, that they seek after types or images, in order to enliven their devotion, and give them a more intimate and strong conception of those exemplary lives, which they desire to imitate.
Now I assert, that this belief, where it reaches beyond the memory or senses, is of a similar nature, and arises from similar causes, with the transition of thought and vivacity of conception here explained.
And as it first begins from an object, present to the senses, it renders the idea or conception of flame more strong and lively than any loose, floating reverie of the imagination.
The thought moves instantly towards it, and conveys to it all that force of conception, which is derived from the impression present to the senses.
But what is there in this whole matter to cause such a strong conception, except only a present object and a customary transition to the idea of another object, which we have been accustomed to conjoin with the former?
If we allow, that belief is nothing but a firmer and stronger conception of an object than what attends the mere fictions of the imagination, this operation may, perhaps, in some measure, be accounted for.
Our mental vision or conception of ideas is nothing but a revelation made to us by our Maker.
We have no idea of this connexion, nor even any distinct notion what it is we desire to know, when we endeavour at a conception of it.
An extension, that is neither tangible nor visible, cannot possibly be conceived: and a tangible or visible extension, which is neither hard nor soft, black nor white, is equally beyond the reach of human conception.
This part of the business, however, did not last long; for the young rascal, being expert at a variety of feints and dodges, of which my aunt had no conception, soon went whooping away, leaving some deep impressions of his nailed boots in the flower-beds, and taking his donkey in triumph with him.
We have come now out of mere vagueness to the definite conception of an Australian from Ballarat with a grey cloak."
"But have you," I asked, "formed any definite conception as to what these perils are?"
would indeed find it difficult to form the faintest conception of my heart-rending situation.
Though I had long known that his servility was false, and all his pretences knavish and hollow, I had had no adequate conception of the extent of his hypocrisy, until I now saw him with his mask off.
As a man upon a field of battle will receive a mortal hurt, and scarcely know that he is struck, so I, when I was left alone with my undisciplined heart, had no conception of the wound with which it had to strive.
And as to ideas, entities, abstractions, and transcendentals, I could never drive the least conception into their heads.
The great difficulty that seemed to stick with the two horses, was to see the rest of my body so very different from that of a _Yahoo_, for which I was obliged to my clothes, whereof they had no conception.
Power, government, war, law, punishment, and a thousand other things, had no terms wherein that language could express them, which made the difficulty almost insuperable, to give my master any conception of what I meant.
I took out my pocket glass, and could then clearly distinguish it above five leagues off, as I computed; but it appeared to the sorrel nag to be only a blue cloud: for as he had no conception of any country beside his own, so he could not be as expert in distinguishing remote objects at sea, as we who so much converse in that element.
First: Though most men have some vague flitting ideas of the general perils of the grand fishery, yet they have nothing like a fixed, vivid conception of those perils, and the frequency with which they recur.
And by those negations, considered along with the affirmative fact of his prodigious bulk and power, you can best form to yourself the truest, though not the most exhilarating conception of what the most exalted potency is.

More Vocab Words

::: agrarian - pertaining to land or its cultivation; Ex. agrarian reform
::: coercion - use of force to get someone to object; compelling; V. coerce
::: colossus - gigantic statue; person or thing of great size or importance
::: coiffure - hairstyle
::: amiable - agreeable; lovable; warmly friendly
::: jocund - merry
::: finale - conclusion; concluding part
::: catapult - slingshot; hurling machine; V: fire from catapult
::: paroxysm - fit or attack of pain, laughter, rage; sudden outburst
::: artisan - a manually skilled worker