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Vocabulary Word

Word: complacency

Definition: self-satisfaction; smugness; ADJ. complacent


Sentences Containing 'complacency'

A subsequent inquiry exonerated Coningham but found that the absence of previous air attacks had led to complacency.
But of course my complacency could hardly get start enough to lift my nose a trifle into the air, before Mr. Bixby would think of something to fetch it down again.
Consider the China pride and stagnant self complacency of mankind.
Her resistance had not injured her with the gentleman, and he was thinking of her with some complacency, when thus accosted by Miss Bingley:``I can guess the subject of your reverie.''
I was casting my eyes with increasing complacency over these and many similar objects, when hasty footsteps were heard in the room outside, and Mr. Spenlow, in a black gown trimmed with white fur, came hurrying in, taking off his hat as he came.
In the course of time I began to get the best of this knotty lesson, and my self complacency moved to the front once more.
In the UK, BBC DJ John Peel called "Ding Dong" "repetitive and dull" and accused Harrison of complacency, while another reviewer dismissed it as a "raspy stab at 'Auld Lang Syne'".
Jane met her with a smile of such sweet complacency, a glow of such happy expression, as sufficiently marked how well she was satisfied with the occurrences of the evening.
Only two of them have been preserved, but as they happen to be two of the seven or eight he mentions with complacency, we may assume they are favourable specimens, and no one who reads the "Numancia" and the "Trato de Argel" will feel any surprise that they failed as acting dramas.
She felt that Jane's feelings, though fervent, were little displayed, and that there was a constant complacency in her air and manner not often united with great sensibility.
The barber of the`Grand Turk'was a spruce young negro, who aired his importance with balmy complacency, and was greatly courted by the circle in which he moved.
The song attacks both Eastern totalitarianism and Western complacency.
Their brother, indeed, was the only one of the party whom she could regard with any complacency.
There was an impressive silence; Morcerf alone knew not why such profound attention was given to an orator who was not always listened to with so much complacency.
Toni openly looks down on Chris for his acceptance of middle-class complacency, a mortgage, and a nine-to-five job.
When we got into the street (which was strange enough to me) and smelt the fish, and pitch, and oakum, and tar, and saw the sailors walking about, and the carts jingling up and down over the stones, I felt that I had done so busy a place an injustice; and said as much to Peggotty, who heard my expressions of delight with great complacency, and told me it was well known (I suppose to those who had the good fortune to be born Bloaters) that Yarmouth was, upon the whole, the finest place in the universe.
``Why, your excellency,''returned the landlord, chuckling and rubbing his hands with infinite complacency,``I think I may take upon myself to say I neglect nothing to deserve the support and patronage of the noble visitors to this poor hotel.''
“He never stops talking about the moose, as though they were the highlight of his first three years in office.” "Globe" columnist John Barber saw Toronto's attitude towards the moose as a sign of their complacency, while a "Star" guest writer suggested that the city has become "a place that cares more about spectacle and cheap visual thrills than it does about its citizens."

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