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Vocabulary Word

Word: cohorts

Definition: group of people who share some common quality; armed band; a group of between 300 and 600 soldiers under one commander (in the ancient Rome)


Sentences Containing 'cohorts'

According to the Kabbalah and the school of Rashba, the original three queens of the demons, Agrat Bat Mahlat, Naamah, Eisheth Zenunim, and all their cohorts give birth to children, except Lilith.
As Tomas and Noli tell Kainam that her game was now up, and that everyone would know her true agenda, she counters by bragging that nobody discovered that she and her cohorts were also responsible for the late Senator Benigno Aquino, Jr.'s assassination.
At first Crassus agreed, but he soon changed his mind and redeployed his men into a hollow square, each side formed by twelve cohorts.
Between 218-222, the emperor promoted him and appointed him as Procurator of Arabia and, from 220 he became a Prefect of the Cohorts and held procuratorships in Syria, Palestine, Bithynia, Pontus, Paphlagonia, Asia, Germania Inferior, Gallia Belgica, Gallia Aquitania and Gallia Lugdunensis.
Fuscus was killed, and the battle standard of the Praetorian Guard lost. The Praetorian cohorts would be restored, but the 5th Alaudae was never reformed.
He made his first chronological appearance in "", freeing fellow Black Dragon cohorts No Face, Tasia, Jarek and Tremor from a U.S. Special Forces security facility, under the pretense that they would reform the Black Dragon organization, but really intending to use them as pawns to slow down any Special Forces agents who might pursue him.
In November 2013, Yubei Huang "et al." published a meta-analysis of 36 studies (2 cohorts, 34 case-controls) in "Cancer Causes Control" which found significant ABC correlation of 1.44 (1.29 – 1.59) for one, 1.76 (1.39 – 2.22) for two, and 1.89 (1.40 – 2.55) for at least three induced abortions.
Initially treated as subclasses, Metatheria and Eutheria are by convention now grouped as infraclasses of the subclass Theria, and in more recent proposals have been demoted further (to cohorts or even magnorders), as cladistic reappraisals of the relationships between living and fossil mammals have suggested that the Theria itself should be reduced in rank.
Instead of case-control matching, Melbye "el al." decided to manually remove the many confounding factors that increased over time (e.g. smoking, late child bearing, etc.) and were raising breast cancer risk for younger women relative to older women (birth-cohorts).
Jarrett and perennial cohorts Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette are, if anything, even sharper, swinging harder and more attuned to each other than ever".
The exact verdict of this trial is unknown, but in view of the fact that Zaliznyak operated outside Russian borders he and his cohorts were spared the death sentence (unlike Pugachev, for example).
These machinations, in cohorts with her old acquaintance Jan Munniks, brought her to the attention of the Hague "Comité van Waakzaamheid" (the Dutch equivalent of the French "Comité de surveillance révolutionnaire").
True to his name, Educated Rapper cultivated an educated, erudite image, humorously contrasting with that of his cohorts [http://www.jayquan.com/mmiceint.htm].
Upon realizing this, Crassus dispatched his son Publius with 1,300 Gallic cavalry, 500 archers and eight cohorts of legionnaires to drive off the horse archers.
Whether marching amid his aides and marshals in the van of countless cohorts that endlessly streamed it over the plains, like an Ohio; or whether with his circumambient subjects browsing all around at the horizon, the White Steed gallopingly reviewed them with warm nostrils reddening through his cool milkiness; in whatever aspect he presented himself, always to the bravest Indians he was the object of trembling reverence and awe.

More Vocab Words

::: recast - reconstruct (a sentence, story, statue, etc.); fashion again
::: agitate - stir up; disturb
::: ceremonious - marked by formality; extremely formal and polite; CF. ceremony: conventional social courtesy
::: irreconcilable - impossible to reconcile; incompatible; not able to be resolved
::: adjacent - adjoining; neighboring; close by
::: clime - climate
::: avert - prevent; avoid; turn away (eyes or thought); Ex. An accident was averted by his quick thinking; Ex. She averted her eyes from the terrible sight.
::: remunerative - (of work) compensating; rewarding; profitable; well-paid; V. remunerate: reward; pay (someone) for work or trouble
::: consign - send to a person or place for sale; deliver officially; entrust; put into the care of another; set apart (for a special purpose); N. consignment; CF. consignor, consignee
::: pejorative - (of a word or phrase) suggesting that someone is of little value; negative in connotation; having a belittling effect; Ex. Many women now considers ``housewife'' a pejorative expression, because it patronized them.