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Vocabulary Word

Word: civil

Definition: having to do with citizens; not military or religious; courteous and polite; Ex. married in a civil ceremony; Ex. civil strife/disorder/law; N. civility; CF. civic


Sentences Containing 'civil'

You began the evening well, Charlotte,''said Mrs. Bennet with civil self command to Miss Lucas.''
To the civil inquiries which then poured in, and amongst which she had the pleasure of distinguishing the much superior solicitude of Mr. Bingley's, she could not make a very favourable answer.
Mr. Bingley was unaffectedly civil in his answer, and forced his younger sister to be civil also, and say what the occasion required.
``That is all very proper and civil, I am sure,''said Mrs. Bennet,``and I dare say she is a very agreeable woman.
In pompous nothings on his side, and civil assents on that of his cousins, their time passed till they entered Meryton.
Elizabeth disdained the appearance of noticing this civil reflection, but its meaning did not escape, nor was it likely to conciliate her.
The housekeeper came; a respectable looking elderly woman, much less fine, and more civil, than she had any notion of finding her.
Perhaps he had been civil only because he felt himself at ease; yet there had been that in his voice which was not like ease.
It was more than civil; it was really attentive; and there was no necessity for such attention.
Each felt for the other, and of course for themselves; and their mother talked on, of her dislike of Mr. Darcy, and her resolution to be civil to him only as Mr. Bingley's friend, without being heard by either of them.
He was a man of manners, like one who had seen the world, and was capable of more civil speech than you could well attend to.
I mark its still tender, civil, cheerful lilac colors.
ON THE DUTY OF CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE I heartily accept the motto,``That government is best which governs least''; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.
Thus, under the name of Order and Civil Government, we are all made at last to pay homage to and support our own meanness.
My civil neighbor, the tax gatherer, is the very man I have to deal with for it is, after all, with men and not with parchment that I quarrel and he has voluntarily chosen to be an agent of the government.
We were approaching Memphis, in front of which city, and witnessed by its people, was fought the most famous of the river battles of the Civil War.
The Southerner of the American Revolution owned slaves; so did the Southerner of the Civil War: but the former resembles the latter as an Englishman resembles a Frenchman.
Well, these twelve thousand livres are his civil list, and are as essential to him as the twelve millions of a king.
Marriage is a civil affair in France, and in order to marry in an orthodox manner you must have papers which undeniably establish your identity.''
There, after a few days, if you like, the civil marriage shall be celebrated without pomp or ceremony.
Some voices were heard to say that the gentleman was right; that he intended to be civil, in his way, and that they would set the example of liberty of conscience, and the mob retired.
But the person who either acquires, or succeeds to a great fortune, does not necessarily acquire or succeed to any political power, either civil or military.
As a man of a civil profession seems awkward in a camp or a garrison, and is even in some danger of being despised there, so does an idle man among men of business.
In the course of the present century, too, there has been no great public calamity, such as a civil war, which could either discourage tillage, or interrupt the interior commerce of the country.
The civil wars of Flanders, and the Spanish government which succeeded them, chased away the great commerce of Antwerp, Ghent, and Bruges.
The English colonists have never yet contributed any thing towards the defence of the mother country, or towards the support of its civil government.
The expense of their own civil government has always been very moderate.
The expense of the civil establishment of Massachusetts Bay, before the commencement of the present disturbances, used to be but about
The civil establishments of Nova Scotia and Georgia are partly supported by an annual grant of parliament; but Nova Scotia pays, besides, about
The ceremonial, too, of the civil government in the colonies, upon the reception of a new governor, upon the opening of a new assembly, etc.
Men may live together in society with some tolerable degree of security, though there is no civil magistrate to protect them from the injustice of those passions.
The acquisition of valuable and extensive property, therefore, necessarily requires the establishment of civil government.
Where there is no property, or at least none that exceeds the value of two or three days labour, civil government is not so necessary.
It thereby introduces some degree of that civil government which is indispensably necessary for its own preservation; and it seems to do this naturally, and even independent of the consideration of that necessity.
Civil government, so far as it is instituted for the security of property, is, in reality, instituted for the defence of the rich against the poor, or of those who have some property against those who have none at all.
Such a clergy, upon such an emergency, have commonly no other resource than to call upon the civil magistrate to persecute, destroy, or drive out their adversaries, as disturbers of the public peace.
The civil magistrate, who could comply with their demand only by giving them something which he would have chosen much rather to take, or to keep to himself, was seldom very forward to grant it.
Those concerning the government of the church, and the right of conferring ecclesiastical benefices, were perhaps the most interesting to the peace and welfare of civil society.
This system of church government was, from the beginning, favourable to peace and good order, and to submission to the civil sovereign.
It has never, accordingly, been the occasion of any tumult or civil commotion in any country in which it has once been established.
All the good effects, both civil and religious, which an established church can be supposed to produce, are produced by it as completely as by any other.
It is, however, in this earliest and rudest state of civil government only, that profit has ever made the principal part of the public revenue of a monarchical state.
The unfunded, exclusive of a large civil-list debt, to
From this revenue, supposing that this system could produce it, must be deducted the revenue usually raised in Ireland and the plantations, for defraying the expense of the respective civil governments.
The emperors great grief was that he must needs engage in the horrors of civil strife.
He erred in his civil administration by too much centralising.
For myself, my Canterbury Pilgrimage has done much; imprisonment on civil process, and want, will soon do more.
Alice thought it would not be civil to say 'No,' though it wasn't at all what she wanted.
What she really wanted to know was, whether it could sting or not, but she thought this wouldn't be quite a civil question to ask.
He really did this in not only a civil but a really kind and charitable way.

More Vocab Words

::: execrable - very bad; detestable
::: deference - courteous regard for another's wish; courteous yielding to another's wish or opinion (showing respect); ADJ. deferential; OP. effrontery
::: cajole - persuade by praise or false promise; coax; wheedle
::: controvert - oppose with arguments; attempt to refute; contradict; ADJ. controversial; N. controversy
::: anneal - reduce brittleness and improve toughness by heating and cooling (metal or glass)
::: cumbersome - heavy and awkward to carry or wear; burdensome; Ex. cumbersome parcel/uniform
::: compound - combine; produce by combining; increase; make worse by adding to or increasing; exacerbate; Ex. compound an error; ADJ: consisting of two or more parts; N: combination of two or more parts; area enclosed by a wall containing a group of buildings; Ex. factory compound; CF. complex
::: whine - complain (in a sad voice); make a high sad sound (as in pain or supplication)
::: seclusion - isolation; solitude; V. seclude: set apart from others; isolate
::: affront - insult; offense; intentional act of disrespect; V: insult or hurt the feelings of intentionally