Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: cession

Definition: yielding to another; ceding


Sentences Containing 'cession'

Actually, it was the municipal elections that decided cession of the old colonies of French to India.
Among the criteria (effective occupation, cession, prescription,conquest, and accretion), the Philippines said that the country "exercised both effective occupation and effective jurisdiction over Bajo de Masinloc since its independence."
Annexed by Britain in exchange for its cession of the Red River Valley, the northernmost parts of the Louisiana Purchase are one of the few North American territories ever ceded by the United States to a foreign power.
George Rock by deed dated 13 Jan 1847 and witnessed by Richard Fowler and Andrew Hoppener, With the cession of California to the United States following the Mexican-American War, the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo provided that the land grants would be honored.
He then returned with his army to Algeciras, where the Castilian forces, being unable to take the great fortress town, were obliged to retreat . This ended their campaign against Granada, at great cost to Castile that was only mitigated by its success at Gibraltar and the cession of the border towns of Quesada, Quadros, Belmar and a payment of 5,000 golden pistoles.
In 1898, Spain ceded the Philippines to the United States and Palmas sat within the boundaries of that cession to the U.S. In 1906, the United States discovered that the Netherlands also claimed sovereignty over the island and the two parties agreed to submit to binding arbitration to resolve the dispute on January 23, 1925.
In 1967 President Jomo Kenyatta's administration had made overtures to the British in order to secure support for the cession of the Triangle to Kenya.
It continued, apparently with various interruptions, until the summer of 179 BC, when Pharnaces, finding himself unable to cope with the combined forces of Eumenes II and Ariarathes IV, was compelled to purchase peace by the cession of all his conquests in Galatia and Paphlagonia, with the exception of Sinope.
Most of these were not, however, treaties of cession; they were in the form of cooperative agreements between two sovereign powers.
Note: These are the names documented not long after cession in 1874 to the United Kingdom, it was then that titles, title holders and their lineage were documented and held in government records these records came to be known as ""Ai Vola ni Kawa Bula"" now maintained under the Native lands and Fisheries Commission.
O.G.C. debuted on Smif-N-Wessun's 1995 album "Dah Shinin"', appearing on the tracks "Sound Bwoy Bureill" and "Cession At Da Doghillee".
Only a handful of Chiefs had signed treaties of cession, and in some of those cases it is doubtful whether they had understood the terms.
The arbitrator noted that no new international law invalidated the legal transfer of territory via cession.
The cession of titles may only be done with the approval of the monarch.
The Santa Rosa Plateau became Rancho Santa Rosa under an 1846 Mexican land grant to cattle and sheep rancher Juan Moreno. With the cession of California to the United States following the Mexican-American War, the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo provided that the land grants would be honored.
With the cession of California to the United States following the Mexican-American War, the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo provided that the land grants would be honored.

More Vocab Words

::: patina - green crust on old bronze works or copper; tone slowly taken by varnished painting
::: importunate - urging; always demanding; troublesomely urgent or persistent
::: judicious - sound on judgment; wise
::: declivity - downward slope
::: slither - slip or slide
::: askance - with a sideways or indirect look (with disapproval or distruct); Ex. look askance at
::: effete - having lost one's original power; barren; worn out; exhausted
::: apothegm - (apophthegm) pithy, compact saying
::: tenet - doctrine; dogma
::: acquittal - deliverance from a charge; V. acquit: free from a charge or accusation; discharge from a duty; conduct (oneself) in a specified manner