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Vocabulary Word

Word: breed

Definition: produce young; rear; bring up; produce (an undesirable condition); N: kind or sort of animal or plant


Sentences Containing 'breed'

Breed's hut was standing only a dozen years ago, though it had long been unoccupied.
It looked as if Nature no longer contained the breed of nobler bloods, but stood on her last toes.
That this combination of preacher and gray mare should breed calamity, seems strange, and at first glance unbelievable; but the fact is fortified by so much unassailable proof that to doubt is to dishonor reason.
One would not imagine that jokers of this robust breed would be sensitive but they were.
To the city, it will be worth many times its cost, for it will breed its species.
Also deviled whitebait; also shrimps of choice quality; and a platter of small soft shell crabs of a most superior breed.
One knows the orders combined in this half breed's architecture without inquiring: one parent Northern, the other Southern.
He had also a superabundance of the discordant, ear splitting, metallic laugh common to his breed a machine made laugh, a Frankenstein laugh, with the soul left out of it.
The horse was of Hungarian breed, and ambled along at an easy pace.
They were probably not unlike that stunted breed which was common all over Scotland thirty or forty years ago, and which is now so much mended through the greater part of the low country, not so much by a change of the breed, though that expedient has been employed in some places, as by a more plentiful method of feeding them.
To any country which was highly improved throughout, it would be more advantageous to import its lean cattle than to breed them.
To prevent the breed of our sheep from being propagated in foreign countries, seems to have been the object of this law.
Nothing is more easy than to tame an animal, and few things more difficult than to get it to breed freely under confinement, even when the male and female unite.
How many animals there are which will not breed, though kept in an almost free state in their native country!
I have kept every breed which I could purchase or obtain, and have been most kindly favoured with skins from several quarters of the world, more especially by the Hon.
The supposed aboriginal stocks must all have been rock-pigeons, that is, they did not breed or willingly perch on trees.
In a breed which has been crossed only once the tendency to revert to any character derived from such a cross will naturally become less and less, as in each succeeding generation there will be less of the foreign blood; but when there has been no cross, and there is a tendency in the breed to revert to a character which was lost during some former generation, this tendency, for all that we can see to the contrary, may be transmitted undiminished for an indefinite number of generations.
I have never met a pigeon, or poultry, or duck, or rabbit fancier, who was not fully convinced that each main breed was descended from a distinct species.
With animals this kind of selection is, in fact, likewise followed; for hardly any one is so careless as to breed from his worst animals.
Savages now sometimes cross their dogs with wild canine animals, to improve the breed, and they formerly did so, as is attested by passages in Pliny.
But, for our purpose, a form of selection, which may be called unconscious, and which results from every one trying to possess and breed from the best individual animals, is more important.
Thus, a man who intends keeping pointers naturally tries to get as good dogs as he can, and afterwards breeds from his own best dogs, but he has no wish or expectation of permanently altering the breed.
In some cases, however, unchanged, or but little changed, individuals of the same breed exist in less civilised districts, where the breed has been less improved.
Perhaps the first pouter-pigeon did not inflate its crop much more than the turbit now does the upper part of its oesophagus--a habit which is disregarded by all fanciers, as it is not one of the points of the breed.
It is known that with pigeons many slight variations now occasionally appear, but these are rejected as faults or deviations from the standard of perfection in each breed.
The common goose has not given rise to any marked varieties; hence the Toulouse and the common breed, which differ only in colour, that most fleeting of characters, have lately been exhibited as distinct at our poultry-shows.
But, in fact, a breed, like a dialect of a language, can hardly be said to have a distinct origin.
In semi-civilised countries, with little free communication, the spreading of a new sub-breed will be a slow process.
As soon as the points of value are once acknowledged, the principle, as I have called it, of unconscious selection will always tend--perhaps more at one period than at another, as the breed rises or falls in fashion--perhaps more in one district than in another, according to the state of civilisation of the inhabitants--slowly to add to the characteristic features of the breed, whatever they may be.
When the individuals are scanty all will be allowed to breed, whatever their quality may be, and this will effectually prevent selection.
Wandering savages or the inhabitants of open plains rarely possess more than one breed of the same species.
The obvious explanation is that the conditions of life have been highly favourable, and that there has consequently been less destruction of the old and young and that nearly all the young have been enabled to breed.
But when many men, without intending to alter the breed, have a nearly common standard of perfection, and all try to procure and breed from the best animals, improvement surely but slowly follows from this unconscious process of selection, notwithstanding that there is no separation of selected individuals.
Intercrossing will chiefly affect those animals which unite for each birth and wander much, and which do not breed at a very quick rate.
If, in our domestic animals, any part or the whole animal be neglected, and no selection be applied, that part (for instance, the comb in the Dorking fowl) or the whole breed will cease to have a uniform character: and the breed may be said to be degenerating.
Even in the same sub-breed, as in that of the short-faced tumbler, it is notoriously difficult to breed nearly perfect birds, many departing widely from the standard.
In the long run selection gains the day, and we do not expect to fail so completely as to breed a bird as coarse as a common tumbler pigeon from a good short-faced strain.
But when a breed has been crossed only once by some other breed, the offspring occasionally show for many generations a tendency to revert in character to the foreign breed--some say, for a dozen or even a score of generations.
It has lately been asserted that two such distinct species as the hare and rabbit, when they can be got to breed together, produce offspring, which are highly fertile when crossed with one of the parent-species.
This elimination of sterility apparently follows from the same cause which allows our domestic animals to breed freely under diversified circumstances; and this again apparently follows from their having been gradually accustomed to frequent changes in their conditions of life.
He may do this methodically, or he may do it unconsciously by preserving the individuals most useful or pleasing to him without any intention of altering the breed.
It is certain that he can largely influence the character of a breed by selecting, in each successive generation, individual differences so slight as to be inappreciable except by an educated eye.
He approved highly of the giant Morgante, because, although of the giant breed which is always arrogant and ill-conditioned, he alone was affable and well-bred.
I know of a lady who asked one of these figure schemers whether her little lap-dog would be in pup and would breed, and how many and of what colour the little pups would be.
I am of the breed of the Panzas, and they are every one of them obstinate, and if they once say 'odds,' odds it must be, no matter if it is evens, in spite of all the world.
No, sir; if a body's out hunting for cowards he don't want to fool away any time amongst them Shepherdsons, becuz they don't breed any of that KIND."
I took with me six cows and two bulls alive, with as many ewes and rams, intending to carry them into my own country, and propagate the breed.
Since my last return I find the breed is considerably increased, especially the sheep, which I hope will prove much to the advantage of the woollen manufacture, by the fineness of the fleeces.
In their marriages, they are exactly careful to choose such colours as will not make any disagreeable mixture in the breed.
There is nothing like the perils of whaling to breed this free and easy sort of genial, desperado philosophy; and with it I now regarded this whole voyage of the Pequod, and the great White Whale its object.

More Vocab Words

::: crossbreed - hybridize; N: hybrid; CF. interbreed; CF. inbreed
::: repertoire - list of works of music, drama, etc., a performer is prepared to present; CF. repertory
::: imbibe - drink in
::: spangle - small shiny metallic piece sewn to clothing for ornamentation
::: mores - conventions; moral standards; moral customs
::: bullion - gold and silver in the form of bars
::: heedless - not noticing; disregarding
::: grill - question severely; cook on a grill; broil; N: cooking surface of parallel metal bars
::: satirical - using satire; mocking
::: wrinkle - small ridge on a smooth surface (face or cloth); V.