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Vocabulary Word

Word: austere

Definition: forbiddingly stern; ascetic; without comfort or enjoyment; severely simple and unornamented; Ex. a monk's austere life; Ex. austere grandeur of the cathedral; N. austerity


Sentences Containing 'austere'

I used to wander among those rigid corpses, and peer into their austere faces, by the hour.
He was an austere man, and had the reputation of being singularly unworldly, for a river man.
His remarkably noble and austere expression struck Morrel, who began his story with trembling.
In the austere system, on the contrary, those excesses are regarded with the utmost abhorrence and detestation.
The austere system of morality has, accordingly, been adopted by those sects almost constantly, or with very few exceptions; for there have been some.
Many of them, perhaps the greater part of them, have even endeavoured to gain credit by refining upon this austere system, and by carrying it to some degree of folly and extravagance; and this excessive rigour has frequently recommended them, more than any thing else, to the respect and veneration of the common people.
He dares not do anything which would disgrace or discredit him in it; and he is obliged to a very strict observation of that species of morals, whether liberal or austere, which the general consent of this society prescribes to persons of his rank and fortune.
All his brother sectaries are, for the credit of the sect, interested to observe his conduct; and, if he gives occasion to any scandal, if he deviates very much from those austere morals which they almost always require of one another, to punish him by what is always a very severe punishment, even where no evil effects attend it, expulsion or excommunication from the sect.
The most opulent church in Christendom does not maintain better the uniformity of faith, the fervour of devotion, the spirit of order, regularity, and austere morals, in the great body of the people, than this very poorly endowed church of Scotland.
And those austere ones; those that foretold other men's deaths; those that were so proud and stately, where are they now?
Those austere ones I mean, such as were Charax, and Demetrius the Platonic, and Eudaemon, and others like unto those.
So he said to him, "It seems to me, Senor Knight-errant, that your worship has made choice of one of the most austere professions in the world, and I imagine even that of the Carthusian monks is not so austere."
The gloomy taint that was in the Murdstone blood, darkened the Murdstone religion, which was austere and wrathful.
There was an inflexibility in her face, in her voice, in her gait and carriage, amply sufficient to account for the effect she had made upon a gentle creature like my mother; but her features were rather handsome than otherwise, though unbending and austere.
His majesty, a prince of much gravity and austere countenance, not well observing my shape at first view, asked the queen after a cold manner “how long it was since she grew fond of a _splacnuck_?” for such it seems he took me to be, as I lay upon my breast in her majesty’s right hand.
And for Radney, though in his infancy he may have laid him down on the lone Nantucket beach, to nurse at his maternal sea; though in after life he had long followed our austere Atlantic and your contemplative Pacific; yet was he quite as vengeful and full of social quarrel as the backwoods seaman, fresh from the latitudes of buck-horn handled bowie-knives.

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