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Vocabulary Word

Word: audacious

Definition: daring; bold; N. audacity


Sentences Containing 'audacious'

A modest new construction program was initiated with some new carriers (Majestic and "Centaur"-class light carriers, and "Audacious"-class large carriers being completed between 1948 thru 1958), along with three "Tiger-class cruisers (completed 1959-61), the "Daring"-class destroyers in the 1950s, and finally the County class DDGs completed in the 1960s.
After a series of winter storms threatened to swamp the hotel, an audacious plan was developed to move it in one piece 520 feet further inland by placing railroad track and 112 railroad flat cars under the raised 460 ft. by 130 ft. building and using six steam locomotives to pull it away from the sea.
As they were entering it, the wicked one, who is the author of all mischief, and the boys who are wickeder than the wicked one, contrived that a couple of these audacious irrepressible urchins should force their way through the crowd, and lifting up, one of them Dapple's tail and the other Rocinante's, insert a bunch of furze under each.
Besides, you promoters of cleanliness have been excessively careless and thoughtless, I don't know if I ought not to say audacious, to bring troughs and wooden utensils and kitchen dishclouts, instead of basins and jugs of pure gold and towels of holland, to such a person and such a beard; but, after all, you are ill-conditioned and ill-bred, and spiteful as you are, you cannot help showing the grudge you have against the squires of knights-errant."
Consider, now, how it must be in the case of four boats all engaging one unusually strong, active, and knowing whale; when owing to these qualities in him, as well as to the thousand concurring accidents of such an audacious enterprise, eight or ten loose second irons may be simultaneously dangling about him.
David Fricke, writing for "Rolling Stone", commended Rose's unrestrained approach and called it "a great, audacious, unhinged and uncompromising hard-rock record." "Rolling Stone" later ranked the album number 12 on its year-end list of 2008's best albums.
First. Euler took the above product formula and proceeded to make a sequence of audacious leaps of logic.
He was a flamboyant dresser and an audacious commander, wildly popular with the Southern public for his escapades in twice encircling the Army of the Potomac.
He was intent on an audacious, immitigable, and supernatural revenge.
he wishes to develop the visual field by multiplying it, to inscribe them all in the space of the same canvas: it is then that the cube will play a role, for Metzinger will utilize this means to reestablish the equilibrium that these audacious inscriptions will have momentarily broken."
I rejoice in my spine, as in the firm audacious staff of that flag which I fling half out to the world.
It’s an audacious, original rollercoaster ride.
Jeb Stuart became famous for two audacious raids around the Union Army of the Potomac in 1862; in his third such attempt, during the Gettysburg Campaign, he squandered much of the cavalry forces of the Army of Northern Virginia and deprived Robert E. Lee of adequate reconnaissance at the beginning of the Battle of Gettysburg, one of the principal reasons for the Confederate defeat there.
One who heard such a speech wrote in his diary: Yesterday I heard Kun speak… it was an audacious, hateful, enthusiastic oratory.
Only the infidel sharks in the audacious seas may give ear to such words, when, with tornado brow, and eyes of red murder, and foam-glued lips, Ahab leaped after his prey.
S/L Bill Edrich had been a bomber pilot during the war and won the DFC in the "RAF's most audacious and dangerous low-level bombing raid" of 1941.
So that there are instances among them of men, who, named with Scripture names--a singularly common fashion on the island--and in childhood naturally imbibing the stately dramatic thee and thou of the Quaker idiom; still, from the audacious, daring, and boundless adventure of their subsequent lives, strangely blend with these unoutgrown peculiarities, a thousand bold dashes of character, not unworthy a Scandinavian sea-king, or a poetical Pagan Roman.
Some critics said "Caress of Steel" was unfocused and an audacious move for the band because of the placement of two back-to-back protracted songs, as well as a heavier reliance on atmospherics and story-telling, a large deviation from "Fly by Night".
The company name "GABA" is an acronym for "girls, be ambitious; boys, be audacious!".
They went away by one of the London night coaches, and I know no more about him; except that his malevolence to me at parting was audacious.
This technically audacious and previously impossible shot created considerable interest in how it had been accomplished, and impressed the Academy enough for Wexler to win the Oscar for Best Cinematography that year.
Thus, gentlemen, though an inlander, Steelkilt was wild-ocean born, and wild-ocean nurtured; as much of an audacious mariner as any.

More Vocab Words

::: refurbish - renovate; make clean, bright, or fresh (make new) again; make bright by polishing; Ex. refurbish an old theater; CF. furbish: polish
::: imperil - put in danger
::: dribble - flow or fall in drops; let saliva flow out slowly from the mouth; move a ball; N.
::: residual - remaining; left over; of a residue; N: residue
::: ribald - marked by vulgar lewd humor; wanton; profane; N. ribaldry: ribald language or joke
::: bluff - pretense (of strength); deception; high cliff; ADJ: rough but good-natured
::: pique - irritation; resentment from wounded pride (eg. loss in a contest); V: provoke; arouse; annoy; cause to feel resentment; Ex. pique her curiosity
::: choreography - art of representing dances in written symbols; arrangement of dances
::: titter - nervous giggle; nervous laugh; V.
::: extrapolation - projection; conjecture; V. extrapolate: infer (unknown information) from known information