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Vocabulary Word

Word: assumption

Definition: something taken for granted; the taking over or taking possession of; Ex. her assumption of power; V. assume


Sentences Containing 'assumption'

There is more in this than the assumption of a rival theory for argument's sake.
Referring to such cases, he remarks, "It is difficult to comprehend the meaning of such facts as these, if we suppose that each species of animal and plant, or each great type of organisation, was formed and placed upon the surface of the globe at long intervals by a distinct act of creative power; and it is well to recollect that such an assumption is as unsupported by tradition or revelation as it is opposed to the general analogy of nature.
Hence the supposed extermination of so many species having similar habits with the rock-pigeon seems a very rash assumption.
Seeing that individual differences of the same kind perpetually recur, this can hardly be considered as an unwarrantable assumption.
On the other hand, the ordinary belief that the amount of possible variation is a strictly limited quantity, is likewise a simple assumption.
Mr. Mivart then asks how did natural selection remove in the adult kangaroo (and in most other mammals, on the assumption that they are descended from a marsupial form), "this at least perfectly innocent and harmless structure?"
The force of this objection rests entirely on the assumption that the changes in the instincts and structure are abrupt.
His eldest son Pedro succeeded him in the possession of the castle, and followed his example in adopting the name, an assumption at which the younger son, Gonzalo, seems to have taken umbrage.
He and Swift and the great humourists always keep themselves out of sight, or, more properly speaking, never think about themselves at all, unlike our latter-day school of humourists, who seem to have revived the old horse-collar method, and try to raise a laugh by some grotesque assumption of ignorance, imbecility, or bad taste.
With what a demure assumption of being immensely older and wiser than I, the fairy little woman said I was 'a silly boy'; and then laughed so charmingly that I forgot the pain of being called by that disparaging name, in the pleasure of looking at her.
When I had started with the Time Machine, I had started with the absurd assumption that the men of the Future would certainly be infinitely ahead of ourselves in all their appliances.
My private opinion is, that this was entirely a gratuitous assumption, and that Pidger was altogether innocent of any such sentiments--to which he had never given any sort of expression that I could ever hear of.
And though of all men the moody captain of the Pequod was the least given to that sort of shallowest assumption; and though the only homage he ever exacted, was implicit, instantaneous obedience; though he required no man to remove the shoes from his feet ere stepping upon the quarter-deck; and though there were times when, owing to peculiar circumstances connected with events hereafter to be detailed, he addressed them in unusual terms, whether of condescension or IN TERROREM, or otherwise; yet even Captain Ahab was by no means unobservant of the paramount forms and usages of the sea.

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::: panache - flair; manner of doing things without any difficulty (causing admiration); flamboyance; bunch of feathers (on a helmet); Ex. with great panache; CF.
::: succor - assist (someone in difficulty); aid; comfort; N.
::: fuddle - make stupid or confused as with alcholic drink; N. in a fuddle: confused
::: dearth - scarcity
::: amble - walking at an easy unhurried pace; V: walk slowly and aimlessly
::: flutter - (of a bird with large wings) wave (the wings) lightly, rapidly, and irregularly; vibrate rapidly or erratically; fly by waving quickly; flitter; N.
::: appropriate - acquire; take possession of for one's own use without permission; set aside for a particular purpose; allocate; CF. misappropriate
::: chaplain - clergyman attached to a chapel