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Vocabulary Word

Word: ascetic

Definition: practicing self-denial; avoiding physical pleasures and comforts; austere; Ex. ascetic life of Buddhist monks; N. asceticism


Sentences Containing 'ascetic'

"Tengu" are associated with the ascetic practice known as Shugendō, and they are usually depicted in the distinctive garb of its followers, the "yamabushi".
Aatomaa's artistic style is characterised by heavy use of primary colors often with an ascetic composition and typographic pictural form.
About 40% of Lithuanians belonged to such fellowships, whose members lived by ascetic principles.
At an appropriate time, he became an ascetic under Arindam Suri.
Benedict's concerns were the needs of monks in a community environment: namely, to establish due order, to foster an understanding of the relational nature of human beings, and to provide a spiritual father to support and strengthen the individual's ascetic effort and the spiritual growth that is required for the fulfillment of the human vocation, theosis.
Brian J. Capper argues that the Beloved Disciple was an aristocratic, priestly member of an 'ascetic quarter', located on Jerusalem's prestigious southwest hill, who had hosted Jesus' last supper in that location.
Capper (see above reference) suggests that anonymity would have been appropriate for one living the withdrawn life of an ascetic, and that under the unnamed disciples of the Gospel may be present either the Beloved Disciple himself or others under his guidance who out of the humility of their ascetic commitment hid their identity or subsumed their witness under that of their spiritual master.
Capper suggests, in order to explain the largely distinctive designation of the Beloved Disciple as one loved by Jesus, that the language of 'love' was particularly related to Jewish groups which revealed the distinctive social characteristics of 'virtuoso religion' in ascetic communities.
Captain Giorgis finally agreed to speak to Joachim's father about the matter and left. The hard working and ascetic young novice had few difficulties in adapting to the monastic life and was soon made steward of Vatopaedi.
Casuistry, and an ascetic morality, made up, in most cases, the greater part of the moral philosophy of the schools.
During the final years of his life, Pâris became increasingly reclusive, and his ascetic lifestyle became increasingly severe, and he practised self-flagellation: Only 36 years old, Pâris died on May 1, 1727.
Ephrem occupied a cell there, practicing the ascetic life, interpreting Holy Scripture, composing poetry and hymns and teaching in the school, as well as instructing young girls in church music.
François de Pâris (1690–1727) was a Parisian Jansenist and a popular religious ascetic whose tomb in the parish cemetery at Saint-Médard gave rise to the convulsionnaire phenomenon.
From 1577 the ascetic reforms introduced by the commendatory abbot Jean de la Barrière were practised here, and were so widely taken up in other monasteries that in 1589 the abbey became the head of the Feuillants as an independent order, which separated from the Cistercian Order.
He later became a Muslim ascetic and mystic poet.
He later retired to Sompting where he led an ascetic lifestyle.
He was an ascetic, who believed in staying away from alcohol.
He was one of the few, very few, translators that have shown any apprehension of the unsmiling gravity which is the essence of Quixotic humour; it seemed to him a crime to bring Cervantes forward smirking and grinning at his own good things, and to this may be attributed in a great measure the ascetic abstinence from everything savouring of liveliness which is the characteristic of his translation.
His Jewish girlfriend Margherita Sarfatti () relates that Nietzsche virtually was the transforming factor in Mussolini's "conversion" from hard Socialism to spiritualistic, ascetic Fascism, as did Charles de Gaulle.
Howat describes his appearance in these years as not having changed much from his younger days: "... the lean, ascetic figure of moderate height, with sharp features, sleek hair, and strong glasses".
However, he earned a good reputation for his ascetic lifestyle and for a miracle by which he raised Doach, the archbishop of Armagh, from the dead.
In some ascetic or puritan religious sects, an attitude of seriousness is always to be taken, and solemnity, sobriety, and puritanism with its hostility to social pleasures and indulgences are the only acceptable attitudes.
In the West in about the year 500, Benedict became so upset by the immorality of society in Rome that he gave up his studies there and chose the life of an ascetic monk in the pursuit of personal holiness, living as a hermit in a cave near the rugged region of Subiaco. In time, setting an example with his zeal, he began to attract disciples.
In true ascetic fashion, he gave away all of the prize money.
Later elaborations of this interpretation treated Enoch as having been a pious ascetic, who, called to mix with others, preached repentance, and gathered (despite the small number of people on Earth) a vast collection of disciples, to the extent that he was proclaimed king.
Many of the convulsionnaires began to live an austere and ascetic lifestyle in cooperatives, referring to each other as 'brother' or 'sister' and taking new names, usually from the Bible.
On the other hand, he had an ascetic outward appearance and declined silk or fine cloths.
Paraskeva-Pyatnitsa “developed a personality and functions of her own on Russian soil.” Icons of the 13th-15th centuries from Novgorod depict Paraskeva as an ascetic figure wearing the red of martyrdom.
Saint Basil of Caesarea codified the precepts for these eastern monasteries in his Ascetic Rule, or "Ascetica", which is still used today in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
The first recorded director of the School of Edessa was Qiiore, who in the early part of the fifth century exhibited not only ascetic and scholarly qualifications, but also administrative ability.
The two offered a contrast in the model of the Hasidic Rebbe, with Elimelech the ascetic scholar, and Zushya giving the impression of the charismatic "saintly simpleton", although he too was well versed in Hasidic philosophy.
They were similar to the mountain ascetic "yamabushi" warrior monks, but unlike the solitary "yamabushi", "sōhei" generally organized into large armies or mobs.
This ascetic group owed its origins to the political manoeuvrings of Herod the Great and consequent friendliness of the Herodian house to the Essenes from the height of Herod the Great's reign to the demise of his son Archelaus in AD 6.
This ascetic sect abhorred the liberality of the Islamic culture of "al-Andalus", including the position of authority that some "dhimmis" held over Muslims.
This practice originated at the tomb of François de Pâris, an ascetic Jansenist deacon who was buried at the cemetery of the parish of Saint-Médard in Paris.
Trelawny then adopted a more ascetic life and moved to Sompting.
Under the great inspiration of Saint Anthony the Great (251-356), ascetic monks led by Saint Pachomius (286-346) formed the first Christian monastic communities under what became known as an "Abbot", from the Aramaic "abba" (father).
What we do have are two hagiographies, his principal work on the foundations of ascetic life 'On the Life of Excellency', and commentaries on mystical themes.
Yet from the writings of Chrysostom it is clear he found joy in ascetic self-discipline, and he had just assumed a celibate life when he was fascinated by a girl named Hermione (Chrysostom ibid.
Yoga is the ascetic path of purification by which the effects of sin ("akusla kamma") may be undone.

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::: sundry - miscellaneous; various; several; N. sundries: small miscellaneous items
::: analogy - similarity; parallelism; comparing two similar things