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Vocabulary Word

Word: apothecary

Definition: druggist; pharmacist


Sentences Containing 'apothecary'

"Aye, aye, steward," cried Stubb, "we'll teach you to drug it harpooneer; none of your apothecary's medicine here; you want to poison us, do ye?
After leaving Westminster School, he was apprenticed, in 1802, to his brother, an apothecary, with the view of adopting the profession of medicine.
Born in 1728 in Strand, London, where his father practised as an apothecary, he was educated at Charterhouse School, with a view to a career in the church.
But the whole drugs which the best employed apothecary in a large market-town, will sell in a year, may not perhaps cost him above thirty or forty pounds.
He moved to London at the age of 14 years to become an apprentice apothecary.
He noted that Almasty are part of the Mongolian and Tibetan apothecary's "materia medica", along with thousands of other animals and plants that live today.
He was apothecary to James I and a founding member of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries in December 1617, and was later Royal Botanist to Charles I. He is known for two monumental works, "Paradisi in Sole Paradisus Terrestris" ("Park-in-Sun's Terrestrial Paradise", 1629), which generally describes the proper cultivation of plants; and "Theatrum Botanicum" ("The Botanical Theatre" or "Theatre of Plants", 1640), the most complete and beautifully presented English treatise on plants of its time.
Heartbroken, Romeo buys poison from an apothecary and goes to the Capulet crypt.
Hunter had been apprenticed to an apothecary before running away to join the British Army.
I saw a little apothecary there--surgeon, or whatever he is--who brought your worship into the world.
If your banker breaks, you snap; if your apothecary by mistake sends you poison in your pills, you die.
In addition, he assisted the Society in obtaining a grant of arms and in preparing a list of all medicines that should be stocked by an apothecary.
In that neighbourhood there were two villages, one of them so small that it had neither apothecary's shop nor barber, which the other that was close to it had, so the barber of the larger served the smaller, and in it there was a sick man who required to be bled and another man who wanted to be shaved, and on this errand the barber was going, carrying with him a brass basin; but as luck would have it, as he was on the way it began to rain, and not to spoil his hat, which probably was a new one, he put the basin on his head, and being clean it glittered at half a league's distance.
It also has Gwen and her father owning an apothecary rather than an antiques shop, suggesting this was changed during the remake's development to be closer to the original film.
It is much shorter, and probably not quite so exact as that of the French taxes.} That state cannot be very great, of which the sovereign has leisure to carry on the trade of a wine-merchant or an apothecary.
John Greenleaf ran an apothecary, 1766-1778.
Nicholas and Smike make their debuts in "Romeo and Juliet", as Romeo and the Apothecary respectively, and are met with great acclaim from the provincial audiences.
Plunkett lived during the mid-eighteenth century in London, on Jermyn Street, and was said to have been an apothecary who was also presumed to be a gentleman.
Rising through the ranks, he eventually achieved the position of apothecary to James I, and a founding member of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries in December 1617; until 1622 he also served on the Court of Assistants, the Society's governing body.
Sancho went along anything but cheerful, for it grieved him that Altisidora had not kept her promise of giving him the smocks; and turning this over in his mind he said to his master, "Surely, senor, I'm the most unlucky doctor in the world; there's many a physician that, after killing the sick man he had to cure, requires to be paid for his work, though it is only signing a bit of a list of medicines, that the apothecary and not he makes up, and, there, his labour is over; but with me though to cure somebody else costs me drops of blood, smacks, pinches, pinproddings, and whippings, nobody gives me a farthing.
She would not listen, therefore, to her daughter's proposal of being carried home; neither did the apothecary, who arrived about the same time, think it at all advisable.
The earliest known production in North America was an amateur one: on 23 March 1730, a physician named Joachimus Bertrand placed an advertisement in the "Gazette" newspaper in New York, promoting a production in which he would play the apothecary.
The neighborhood since 1885 has been home to a variety of establishments, including bakeries, magistrates' and constables' offices, saloons, an apothecary, grocers, tailors, a jewelry store, the Great Western Tea Coffee Co., and others.
The republic of Hamburgh is said to do so from the profits of a public wine-cellar and apothecary's shop.
The skill of an apothecary is a much nicer and more delicate matter than that of any artificer whatever; and the trust which is reposed in him is of much greater importance.

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