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Vocabulary Word

Word: amiss

Definition: wrong; faulty; Ex. something amiss; ADV.


Sentences Containing 'amiss'

"Convinced that something was amiss with him, she rushed down the steps--for the house was none other than the opium den in which you found me to-night--and running through the front room she attempted to ascend the stairs which led to the first floor.
A week before Newminster was scheduled to run in the Derby, there were reports that he had gone amiss.
Ah, count, he esteems you so highly, tell him that he has spoken amiss.''
Be in your chamber then at that hour, and do not take it amiss if your visitor wear a mask."
But if it be somewhat that is amiss in thine own disposition, that doth grieve thee, mayest thou not rectify thy moral tenets and opinions.
He follers her about, he makes hisself a sort o' servant to her, he loses in a great measure his relish for his wittles, and in the long-run he makes it clear to me wot's amiss.
He is not afraid to reprove what he thinks amiss; and the astonishment of Marcus at this will prove, if proof were needed, that he was not used to plain dealing.
His papers were in a little confusion, in consequence of Mr. Jack Maldon having lately proffered his occasional services as an amanuensis, and not being accustomed to that occupation; but we should soon put right what was amiss, and go on swimmingly.
I expressed as much of my astonishment as was then capable of expression, and asked if he could guess what it was that she had taken so much amiss, so suddenly.
I take it amiss, too, that he calls me envious, and explains to me, as if I were ignorant, what envy is; for really and truly, of the two kinds there are, I only know that which is holy, noble, and high-minded; and if that be so, as it is, I am not likely to attack a priest, above all if, in addition, he holds the rank of familiar of the Holy Office.
I tried my canoe in a large pond, near my master’s house, and then corrected in it what was amiss; stopping all the chinks with _Yahoos’_ tallow, till I found it staunch, and able to bear me and my freight; and, when it was as complete as I could possibly make it, I had it drawn on a carriage very gently by _Yahoos_ to the sea-side, under the conduct of the sorrel nag and another servant.
If I did anything amiss or shameful, the cause of Philosophy was not in me endangered; nor did I wrong the multitude by transgressing as a professed philosopher.
inquired Debray;``he is not much amiss, according to my ideas of good looks.''
Lady Catherine approached, and, after listening for a few minutes, said to Darcy:``Miss Bennet would not play at all amiss if she practiced more, and could have the advantage of a London master.
Nay, I come of no ungrateful stock, for all the world knows, but particularly my own town, who the Panzas from whom I am descended were; and, what is more, I know and have learned, by many good words and deeds, your worship's desire to show me favour; and if I have been bargaining more or less about my wages, it was only to please my wife, who, when she sets herself to press a point, no hammer drives the hoops of a cask as she drives one to do what she wants; but, after all, a man must be a man, and a woman a woman; and as I am a man anyhow, which I can't deny, I will be one in my own house too, let who will take it amiss; and so there's nothing more to do but for your worship to make your will with its codicil in such a way that it can't be provoked, and let us set out at once, to save Senor Samson's soul from suffering, as he says his conscience obliges him to persuade your worship to sally out upon the world a third time; so I offer again to serve your worship faithfully and loyally, as well and better than all the squires that served knights-errant in times past or present."
Of a sudden--or so she thowt, you unnerstand--the day broke, wet and windy, and she was lying b'low a heap of stone upon the shore, and a woman was a-speaking to her, saying, in the language of that country, what was it as had gone so much amiss?'
Of her lips I say nothing, for they are so fine and thin that, if lips might be reeled, one might make a skein of them; but being of a different colour from ordinary lips they are wonderful, for they are mottled, blue, green, and purple--let my lord the governor pardon me for painting so minutely the charms of her who some time or other will be my daughter; for I love her, and I don't find her amiss."
The artist is capable of being stimulated to artistic expression by all things seen, no matter what; to him nothing comes amiss.
This was her as now asked what it was that had gone so much amiss.
Thou must therefore blame nobody, but if it be in thy power, redress what is amiss; if it be not, to what end is it to complain?
Unfortunately, what he did amiss is more striking to the imagination than what he did aright, and he will be chiefly remembered by it.
What I cannot help taking amiss is that he charges me with being old and one-handed, as if it had been in my power to keep time from passing over me, or as if the loss of my hand had been brought about in some tavern, and not on the grandest occasion the past or present has seen, or the future can hope to see.
Whatsoever doth happen in the ordinary course and consequence of natural events, neither the Gods, (for it is not possible, that they either wittingly or unwittingly should do anything amiss) nor men, (for it is through ignorance, and therefore against their wills that they do anything amiss) must be accused.
Whilst both know something is amiss, both do nothing about it.

More Vocab Words

::: counterpart - thing that completes another; things very much alike; thing that has the same purpose in a different system
::: gibberish - nonsense; nonsensical or unintelligible talk or writing; babbling
::: dour - sullen; gloomy; stubborn
::: quixotic - idealistic but impractical; CF. Don Quixote
::: breach - breaking of contract or duty; fissure or gap; opening; V.
::: plumage - feathers of a bird;
::: amphitheater - oval building with tiers of seats; CF. arena
::: concurrent - happening at the same time; in agreement
::: excerpt - selected passage (written or musical) taken from a longer work; V.
::: stupefy - stun; make numb (as with a drug); amaze