Vocabulary Builder

Vocabulary Builder

    Improve Your Writing

  • Boost your vocabulary
  • See words in the context of real sentences
  • Learn by association and by definition
  • Master a new lexicon!

Get Started Below

Vocabulary Word

Word: abdicate

Definition: renounce; give up (position, right, or responsibility)


Sentences Containing 'abdicate'

After a brief war with Sweden, Christian had to abdicate in order to preserve Norwegian autonomy, established in a personal union with Sweden.
After much soul-searching, Jack decides to abdicate, leaving Willie to take the throne as King William V. Jack leaves the palace, his reign of just over 200 days at an end, to be happily reunited with his girlfriend Kathy and go into seclusion in Mexico. Later, he returns to England and writes his memoirs - this book.
After trying to assert his new-found authority, conservatives led by Cabinet Secretary Sir Godwin Rodd (known as "Sir God"), "suggest" that he abdicate his throne.
If Polish nobles forced Władysław II Jagiełło to abdicate the throne, he would return to Lithuania demanding the throne of the Grand Duke.
In late 1513, Raza was forced to abdicate after failing to quell a serious rebellion by the Thet people, who occupied Wethali for 29 days.
King Ladislaus I (1077–1095) managed to persuade King Solomon, who had been ruling in some western counties, to abdicate the throne.
Saladin moved north towards Aleppo, besieging it on December 30 after Gumushtigin refused to abdicate his throne.
The mutiny of Aranjuez in 1808 led King Charles IV of Spain to abdicate in favor of his son, Ferdinand VII.
The speed with which armies collapse, bureaucracies abdicate, and social structures dissolve once the autocrat is removed frequently surprises American policymakers."
There is no provision in the law for a monarch to unilaterally abdicate; the only Australian monarch to abdicate, Edward VIII, did so as a consequence of abdicating as monarch of the United Kingdom, with which the Australian government had agreed.
Thus, to abdicate the sovereign had first formally to resign (through a proper, signed, written instrument of abdication, that of course was witnessed; and in person); then, parliament had to enact legislation which recognised, approved of, and ratified the abdication.
While sometimes a monarch may be forced to abdicate in favour of his or her heir, on other occasions the royal family as a whole has been rejected, the throne going to an elected candidate.

More Vocab Words

::: analgesia - condition of being unable to feel pain
::: furtive - stealthy; quiet and secret (trying to escape notice); sneaky; Ex. furtive glance
::: aphorism - pithy maxim or saying; ADJ. aphoristic
::: conformity - harmony; agreement with established rules or customs; similarity; Ex. behave in conformity with; V. conform: be similar; act in agreement; comply; Ex. conform to the rule; CF. conformance
::: pragmatist - practical person; N. pragmatism: pragmatic way of dealing with things
::: levitate - rise and float in the air (especially by magical means); CF. light
::: fancy - imagination (of a whimsical or fantastic nature); capricious liking; V: imagine; be fond of; ADJ. decorative; elaborate
::: recrimination - countercharges; V. recriminate
::: negate - cancel out; nullify; cause to have no effect; deny; N. negation
::: superannuated - retired or disqualified because of age; outmoded; obsolete