Confused Words: forbear vs forebear

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1. Labour not as one to whom it is appointed to be wretched, nor as one that either would be pitied, or admired; but let this be thine only care and desire; so always and in all things to prosecute or to , as the law of charity, or mutual society doth require.
2. I have other complaints to make upon this vexatious occasion; but I troubling myself or you any further.
3. As the silent harpoon burned there like a serpent's tongue, Starbuck grasped Ahab by the arm--"God, God is against thee, old man; !
4. I had much ado to defend myself against these detestable animals, and could not starting when they came on my face.
5. A picture naturally leads our thoughts to the original[2]: the mention of one apartment in a building naturally introduces an enquiry or discourse concerning the others[3]: and if we think of a wound, we can scarcely reflecting on the pain which follows it[4].
6. And I may say with truth, that in the midst of my own misfortunes I could not lamenting my poor nurse, the grief she would suffer for my loss, the displeasure of the queen, and the ruin of her fortune.
7. In the mean time I was not able to groaning and shedding tears, and turning my head towards my sides; letting him know, as well as I could, how cruelly I was hurt by the pressure of his thumb and finger.
8. And though perchance thou doest the very act of some sins, yet hast thou in thyself an habitual disposition to them, but that either through fear, or vainglory, or some such other ambitious foolish respect, thou art restrained.
9. The evening wind made such a disturbance just now, among some tall old elm-trees at the bottom of the garden, that neither my mother nor Miss Betsey could glancing that way.
10. "The Courant" commented "her musical Janet Jackson is occasionally known as Damita Jo, so why shouldn't Beyonce have an alter-ego, too?".
11. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to , not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth.
12. And therefore, in recounting the numbers of those who have been killed in battle, I cannot but think you have said the thing which is not.” I could not shaking my head, and smiling a little at his ignorance.
13. In spite of the gross flattery and coarseness of this address, Madame Danglars could not gazing with considerable interest on a man capable of expending six millions in twelve months, and who had selected Paris for the scene of his princely extravagance.
14. As I hurried through the engine room, picturesquely gotten up in storm toggery, I met Tom, and could not delivering myself of a mean speech`Ain't you glad YOU don't have to go out sounding?'
15. 'Our friend Waterbrook will excuse me if I to explain myself generally, on account of the magnitude of the interests involved.'
16. When Churchill was given the best room in the hotel, on account of his lineage, Freud (in a reference to his own famous ) declared it was the first time in his life that he had been "out-grandfathered".
17. He mentioned it in a very artful manner at council, where I was told that some of the wisest appeared, at least by their silence, to be of my opinion; but others, who were my secret enemies, could not some expressions which, by a side-wind, reflected on me.
18. Upon this point, I cannot doing justice to the queen my mistress, and Glumdalclitch my nurse, whose persons were as sweet as those of any lady in England.
19. Mayhew having concluded his narration, Ahab put such questions to him, that the stranger captain could not inquiring whether he intended to hunt the White Whale, if opportunity should offer.
20. henceforth to complain of the trouble of a courtly life, either in public before others, or in private by thyself.
21. Franz could not breaking in upon the apparently interesting conversation passing between the countess and Albert, to inquire of the former if she knew who was the fair Albanian opposite, since beauty such as hers was well worthy of being observed by either sex.
22. But I descanting further, and rather leave the judicious reader to his own remarks and application.
23. The direct of the Dukes and Earls of Kingson-upon-Hull was Sir Henry Pierrepont who represented Nottinghamshire in Parliament.

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